Clark Hunter grows his faith by sharing it.

There are two unwavering loves in Clark Hunter’s life: a sweet, simple song and his steadfast Catholic faith.

Hunter has lived at AlmaVia of Camarillo for a little over a year, bringing with him his spiritual legacy and his 25 years of experience as a lay minister in Newbury Park, California. Now 83, Hunter spends his time attending weekly Mass and spiritual groups, sharing his faith while strengthening that of other Camarillo residents.

ter’s sister was the musician in the family, and he didn’t grow to appreciate it fully until he got older. Today, music is an important part of his worship experience. “Sometimes when a bunch of us are together for services and there’s a musician performing, we sing together,” Hunter says. “That’s our way of expressing our faith.”

Growing up in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, Hunter started growing in his faith as a young adult at Penn State, where he studied geography, history, and foreign languages including Spanish, Russian, and French. He joined the campus Catholic club, where he grew spiritually and made great friends.

Finding Solace In a Bereavement Group
At AlmaVia of Camarillo, Hunter has found a new kind of camaraderie. When his wife died a few months ago, he turned to a bereavement group in the senior living community to help him work through his grief. He found that listening to the experiences of other residents was most therapeutic.

“We go around the table and talk about our feelings. It’s comforting to me,” Hunter says.

Hunter’s found comfort in the new relationships he’s developed and in his faith work. He enjoys assisting with Mass, reminding people of upcoming services and helping the priest bring sacred vessels to the altar. It’s in performing these small tasks that he experiences the joy of his faith.

“I love my church, and I like to do something to help­—to do something pleasing to God,” he says. “I love my faith, and I love God. It’s a part of me and a part of my culture.”